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Boudica, Romans and Wars of the Roses in north Warwickshire

Boudica, Romans and Wars of the Roses in north Warwickshire        Boudica, Romans and Wars of the Roses in north Warwickshire
Boudica, Romans and Wars of the Roses in north Warwickshire        Boudica, Romans and Wars of the Roses in north Warwickshire

Boudica, Romans and Wars of the Roses in north Warwickshire

Manduessedum (or Manduesedum) was a Romen fort founded in around c AD 50-AD 60 on the Roman Watling Street (A5) in the Roman province of Britannia.

Today it is known as Mancetter, on the outskirts of the small market town of Atherstone in north Warwickshire.

Boudica was married to Prasutagus, ruler of the Iceni people of East Anglia. When the Romans conquered southern England in AD 43, they allowed Prasutagus to continue to rule. However, when Prasutagus died the Romans decided to rule the Iceni directly and confiscated the property of the leading tribesmen. They are also said to have stripped and flogged Boudica and defiled her daughters.

These actions exacerbated widespread resentment at Roman rule.

Around 61 AD, while the Roman governor Gaius Suetonius Paullinus was leading a campaign in North Wales, the Iceni rebelled under the leadership of Boudica, members of other tribes joining them.

Boudica's warriors successfully defeated the Roman Ninth Legion and destroyed the capital of Roman Britain, which was then at Colchester. They went on to destroy London and Verulamium (St Albans), thousands being killed. Boudicca was finally, Boudicca was finally defeated by a Roman army led by the Roman general Suetonius Paullinus.

Many Britons were killed and Boudica is thought by some to have poisoned herself to avoid capture.

For many years the final battle between Boudica and the Roman invaders is believed to have taken place somewhere on Watling Street with many historians arguing that it took place at or near Manduessedum.

Manduessedum gradually developed into a civilian settlement and became a centre of a pottery making industry. Up to 30 kilns dating from the Roman period have been found in the area.

In more recent times Atherstone became a centre for the manufacture of hats which have been made locally since Tudor times.

Hatting  has now disappeared and the town has become a convenient centre for the distribution industry.

Spelling and pronunciation of the rebel queen's name is a controversial matter, Boudica, Boudicca or Boadicea, take your choice (and historian), they are all claimed to be correct.

An argument for this being the battle site can be found on http://atherstonecivicsociety.co.uk/projectrm/qr5/

The Battle of Bosworth Field was the last significant battle of the Wars of the Roses, the civil war between the Houses of Lancaster and York that raged across England in the latter half of the 15th century.

Fought on 22nd August 1485, the battle was won by the Lancastrians, under their leader Henry Tudor, who was to became the first English monarch of the Tudor dynasty.

His opponent Richard III, the last king of the House of York, was killed in the battle, marking the end of the Plantagenet dynasty.

The exact site of the battle close to the border between north Warwickshire and Leicestershire has been disputed because of the lack of conclusive data, and memorials have been erected at different locations.

In 1974 the Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Centre was built on a site at Ambion Hill that has since been challenged by several scholars and historians. In October 2009 a team of researchers, who had performed geological surveys and archaeological digs in the area, suggested a location near Stoke Golding, two miles (3.2 km) southwest of Ambion Hill which had previously been believed to be the site of the battle.

In August 1485, Henry Tudor led a rebellion against the King, Richard III. He landed in southern Wales from France with a small contingent of French troops and marched through his birthplace of Pembrokeshire, recruiting soldiers as he went towards north Warwickshire and southern Leicestershire.

The night before the battle Tudor and his troops camped at Merivale on the outskirts of Atherstone, just a short march along the line of the Roman Watling Street to Stoke Golding following the line of the county boundary.

Henry's force engaged Richard's army and defeated it, Richard being killed in the battle. He was the last English king to die in battle on home soil and the first since Harold was killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

Henry was crowned on the battlefield ascending to the English throne as Henry VII.

After the battle Richard's corpse was taken to Leicester and buried without pomp and respect.

His original tomb monument is believed to have been removed during the Reformation, and his remains were lost for more than five centuries, believed to have been thrown into the River Soar.

In 2012, an archaeological excavation was commissioned by the Richard III Society on a city council car park on the site once occupied by the Greyfriars Priory Church.

Following radiocarbon dating the University of Leicester identified a skeleton found in the excavation as that of Richard III.

Richard's remains were reburied in Leicester Cathedral on 26th March 2015.

To go to the battlefields website click below

www.bosworthbattlefield.org.uk

An interesting take on the battle can be found on

http://www.stokegolding.co.uk/the-village/

 

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Boudica, Romans and Wars of the Roses in north Warwickshire        Boudica, Romans and Wars of the Roses in north Warwickshire
Boudica, Romans and Wars of the Roses in north Warwickshire        Boudica, Romans and Wars of the Roses in north Warwickshire